Volunteering with Fibromyalgia

Volunteering with Fibromyalgia
Christine Tender Points After my career had been sidelined by fibromyalgia for more than a year, I began to consider ways I might be useful outside of the workforce. I naively believed that even though full-time employment was impossible, I easily could volunteer for a few hours a week. It didn’t take long to discover how wrong I was. Donating my skills and experience was much more difficult than I thought it would be. Although my assistance was welcomed wherever I went, there always was a time commitment required. I shouldn’t have been surprised to learn that schedules are mandatory for any functioning organization — including all of the nonprofits I approached. I carefully explained to each volunteer director about fibromyalgia’s good days and bad days and not knowing in advance when either might occur. Each director said they would understand if I wasn’t able to come in when expected. However, my conscience wouldn’t allow me to promise something I was doubtful I could do. I agreed instead to come in when I was able. The result of my unreliability was being assigned menial, boring tasks. These jobs were unfulfilling and provided little motivation for me to return. I bounced from one volunteer position to another. Then I remembered the local hospice founder who onc
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8 comments

  1. Donna Zegalia says:

    I have tried different volunteer positions and several were too much for me. I am now a volunteer for a local hospital in the NODA (No one dies alone) program. It is uplifting, full of love, and leaves me with a sense of accomplishment. Sometimes you have to try a few different things before you get to a place where everything works out.

    • Christine Lynch says:

      Thanks for your comment, Donna. I hadn’t heard of NODA, but I will inquire at our local hospital. Sounds like a good replacement for the organization I left behind when I moved cross country.

    • Jeanne Ann says:

      I volunteered for NODA also. Once I remarried and relocated, the drive just became too long (about an hour each way) so I eventually had to quit. Since then I’ve been looking for other opportunities near where I live. However, since I now live in a much smaller community, I haven’t been able to find any volunteer positions that fit. I do continue to look. I also loved working with near death people and volunteered for Hospice also.

  2. Maureen says:

    I also went for volunteering with weekly commitments but finally stopped because I was trying (very slowly) to clean out to sell. And truthfully some days I really had to push myself and then to recover for the next week
    Still cleaning out, am not sure what is next but new ideas are so helpful.
    This is the first reference that I have come across. Thanks so much.

  3. StevefromMA says:

    Good for you folks thinking of volunteer service. I volunteer cooking at a soup kitchen one day a month, pretty challenging many times but the guests appreciate it.

  4. Cathy Mitchell says:

    Thank you so much for this article. Have the same situation with the same guilty feelings about my reliability. I am going to look into this as soon as I recover from my latest episode. I just could not think of where I could be useful with this damn disease!

  5. Tanya says:

    Thank you so much for your very inspiring story, it has given me a new perspective, one I didn’t think of. I’ve also had rubbish experiences with voluntary work after having to give up work, and life as I USED to know it. What you’ve said has resonated with me and I am going to look into this.

  6. Lindy Brockington says:

    Very timely article as I just emailed an animal shelter close to my house and asked about volunteering to spend time with the kitties. I’m not able to help clean or do physical labor, but if the kitties need some company, I am their girl!!

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