Review Study Urges Precise Diagnostic Guidelines for Fibromyalgia, MPS

Review Study Urges Precise Diagnostic Guidelines for Fibromyalgia, MPS
There are marked inconsistencies in the diagnostic criteria used to distinguish fibromyalgia from myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), a review study shows. Studies aimed at defining standardized diagnostic guidelines for each condition are urgently needed to overcome this limitation. The review study, "Fibromyalgia and myofascial pain syndrome: Two sides of the same coin? A scoping review to determine the lexicon of the current diagnostic criteria," was published in Muscoloskeletal Care. Fibromyalgia and MPS are two of the most commonly diagnosed chronic muscle pain disorders. While fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread muscle pain and palpable tender points, MPS normally affects only one group of muscles and is associated with motor and sensory impairments. One of the hallmarks of MPS is the presence of myofascial trigger points, which are small, painful nodules located within muscle fibers. In some cases, these trigger points may resemble the tender points associated with fibromyalgia, leading "to the misdiagnosis of MPS as [fibromyalgia]." The study team said that "improper diagnosis of either condition results in a host of negative repercussions, including unnecessary medical tests and referrals, lack of symptom improvement, prolonged time to diagnose, patient frustration and an increased burden on the healthcare delivery system." Therefore, identifying and defining precise diagnostic guidelines for each disorder is crucial to ensure an
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