Clinicians Using Certain Criteria May Fail to Diagnose Almost Half of Fibromyalgia Cases, Study Suggests

Clinicians Using Certain Criteria May Fail to Diagnose Almost Half of Fibromyalgia Cases, Study Suggests
Diagnosis of fibromyalgia based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision may lead to misdiagnosis, according to a retrospective analysis of cases in a single rheumatology clinic. Results of the study showed that clinicians failed to identify almost 50% of positive fibromyalgia cases according to the published criteria. The study, “Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia: Disagreement Between Fibromyalgia Criteria and Clinician-Based Fibromyalgia Diagnosis in a University Clinic,” was published in the journal Arthritis Care & Research. Recently, an increasing amount of studies have reported that fibromyalgia is overdiagnosed, with about 75 percent of the people diagnosed with the disease not satisfying the currently published criteria. “The self-report nature of fibromyalgia symptoms facilitates the uncertainty that surrounds fibromyalgia diagnosis,” the researchers wrote. To investigate possible diagnostic misclassification, these researchers compared expert physician diagnoses with published criteria. They considered both underdiagnoses as well as overdiagnoses. They analyzed data from 497 patients followed at a rheumatology clinic who completed the Multidimensional Health Assessment Questionnaire (MD-HAQ), which scores on a scale from zero to three, with three indicating the worst status. Patients were also evaluated according to the 2011 modification of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Preliminary Diagnostic Criteria for Fibromyalgia
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