Milnacipran Did Not Help Pain Modulation in Fibromyalgia Clinical Trial, Results Showed

Milnacipran Did Not Help Pain Modulation in Fibromyalgia Clinical Trial, Results Showed
Milnacipran (brand name Savella), an antidepressant that is widely prescribed for pain in fibromyalgia patients, did not significantly reduce pain compared to placebo after one month of treatment, French researchers found. Their study, “Milnacipran poorly modulates pain in patients suffering from fibromyalgia: a randomized double-blind controlled study,” was published in the journal Drug Design, Development and Therapy. Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic pain, especially in the joints and muscles associated with fatigue. Pain is a subjective experience. Fibromyalgia patients are known to have "altered central modulation" of pain, which refers to refers to processes in our central nervous system that can ease or block the pain experience. The degree to which a patient can modulate the pain experience can be tested using an experimental technique called conditioned pain modulation (CPM). Studies have also shown that fibromyalgia patients exhibit dysregulation of neurotransmitters (important signaling molecules that activate the nervous system). Because antidepressants can increase the levels of neurotransmitters in the brain, they may be used in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Specifically, an antidepressant called milnacipran helps regulate levels of neurotransmitters known as monoamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin), which are known t
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