Sex Differences Study Finds Female Patients Have More Tender Points

Sex Differences Study Finds Female Patients Have More Tender Points
Among people with fibromyalgia, women may be prone to having more tender points on their bodies than men, a study exploring sex differences suggests. In contrast, no other significant sex differences were found in terms of fibromyalgia symptom severity. The study, "Sex-Related Differences in Symptoms and Psychosocial Outcomes in Patients With Fibromyalgia: A Prospective Questionnaire Study," was conducted by a team from the Mayo Clinic. It was published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings: Innovations, Quality & Outcomes. Fibromyalgia is more common in women than in men; more than four out of every five people with the pain disorder are female. However, whether there are sex-based differences regarding symptoms and clinical outcomes among fibromyalgia patients is still unclear. Notably, prior studies have reported contradictory results. "Given the degree of variability in previous study findings, the objective of our prospective questionnaire study was to explore the association between sex and various clinical symptoms and psychosocial outcomes in the FM [fibromyalgia] patient population," the researchers wrote. Responses were collected from 668 patients who were referred to the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Clinic at Mayo. Nearly 91% of the patients were women (606), and the mean age was 47.2 years. The participants completed a variety of questionnaires related to fibromyalgia and its symptoms, to include the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-R), the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, and the Medical Outcomes Study Sleep Scale. Demographic and clinical data, obtained from electronic health records, also were assessed. The results showed no significant sex-based differences in terms of demographic factors; in the overall gro
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