Vibroacoustic Stimulation Can Ease Symptoms, Improve Sleep in Some Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Contends

Vibroacoustic Stimulation Can Ease Symptoms, Improve Sleep in Some Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Contends
Vibroacoustic stimulation — delivering sound-driven vibrations to the skin while seated or lying in bed — can ease fibromyalgia symptoms, depression and everyday pain, as well as improve patients' sleep, a clinical study suggests. These findings provide preliminary evidence that a type of treatment called rhythmic sensory stimulation (RSS) may relieve fibromyalgia symptoms, supporting future investigations about the effects of this intervention on chronic pain. The study “A parallel randomized controlled trial examining the effects of rhythmic sensory stimulation on fibromyalgia symptoms” was published in the journal PLOS ONE. RSS is a broad term to describe the use of vibrations, sounds, and visual flickering stimuli applied in intermittent pulses or continuous forms. For example, the application of vibrations to the skin has been used to reduce acute pain and help rehabilitation in a variety of conditions. However, its benefit for chronic pain is less known. A few studies have looked at the impact of vibroacoustic stimulation in fibromyalgia, using sound-driven vibrations applied to localized body regions or to the whole body. These studies have focused on the use of rhythmic gamma-frequency (30 – 120 Hz) sound-driven stimulation, but results have been ambiguous. In this clinical trial (NCT02493348) researchers investigated two questions: if vibroacoustic RSS is effective for reducing the severity of fibromyalgia symptoms, and if changing the stimuli parameters (frequency, time and wave pattern) changes the treatment effect. Fifty patients with fibromyalgia were assigned randomly to two groups. One group received a continuous vibroacoustic stimulation of constant frequency (40 Hz) for 30 minutes, five days per week, over five wee
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.