Fibromyalgia Patients’ Cognitive Issues Related to Depression, Research Reveals

Fibromyalgia Patients’ Cognitive Issues Related to Depression, Research Reveals
Many of the cognitive issues experienced by patients with fibromyalgia can be attributed to depression. That finding comes from the study “The effect of depressive symptoms on cognition in patients with fibromyalgia,” which was published recently in the journal PLOS One. Fibromyalgia is a chronic disease that is characterized by pain, fatigue, and depression. In addition,  several studies have demonstrated that patients with fibromyalgia have cognitive impairment compared to healthy people used as controls in the studies — particularly in regard to working memory processes, attention, executive processes, and processing speed. Working memory refers to a cognitive process that is responsible for temporarily holding information available for processing. Executive functions are a set of processes that have to do with managing oneself and one's resources in order to achieve a goal. Patients with fibromyalgia also frequently display psychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety disorder, and sleep dysfunction. Many researchers believe that cognitive dysfunction in patients with fibromyalgia can be attributed to these three psychiatric comorbidities. Specifically, depression has been shown to lead to severe neuropsychological impairment. In particular, depressed patients show defects in attention, memory, psychomotor speed (physical movement related to conscious cognitive processing), processing speed, and executive function. Researchers set out to investigate whether cognitive issues in fibromyalgia patients can be explained by other factors associated with fibromyalgia, such as depression, anx
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.