Moderate Drinking Helps Chronic Pain Patients More Than Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Finds

Moderate Drinking Helps Chronic Pain Patients More Than Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Finds
Moderate drinking reduced fibromyalgia patients' pain and depression, but the benefits were more pronounced in people with chronic non-fibromyalgia pain, a study showed. The research in the journal Pain Medicine is titled “Moderate Alcohol Consumption Is Associated with Reduced Pain and Fibromyalgia Symptoms in Chronic Pain Patients.” Studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption protects the heart, decreases the risk of death, diabetes and dementia, reduces depression, and improves cognitive function, physical function, and quality of life. Moderate consumption in women is considered to be one drink a day and in men two drinks. In contrast, heavy drinkers are at greater risk of an injury, becoming an alcoholic, developing a liver or heart disease, becoming depressed, and having other health problems. The National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse defines a heavy drinker as a women who has more than seven drinks a week and a man who has more than 14. Previous research on the link between alcohol consumption and pain has shown that low consumption reduces rheumatoid arthritis patients' pain and the disability that patients with low back pain experience. Another finding was that moderate drinking prevents chronic pain from developing. If a person is already experiencing pain, alcohol fails to curb it, however. Fibromyalgia studies have shown that low to moderate drinking improves patients' symptoms, disability, and quality of life. Researchers
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