Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Doubles Risk Of Serious Traffic Crashes: ICES Study

Fibromyalgia Diagnosis Doubles Risk Of Serious Traffic Crashes: ICES Study
Being diagnosed with fibromyalgia also indicates a doubling of the risk of a person becoming involved in a serious traffic crash, and that elevated statistical risk continues for years after the initial diagnosis, according to a new study by researchers at the Toronto based Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) to be published The Journal of Rheumatology. Fibromyalgia (FM) is a common but not-well-understood disorder of unknown etiology, and characterized by widespread pain, that is believed to affect more than 200,000 Canadian adults. Estimates of the number of Americans affected vary substantially. The National Institutes of Health says some 5 million Americans 18 or older are afflicted with the syndrome, while others maintain it's more like 8 to 12 million. Whichever the correct metric is, the numbers of North Americans suffering from this condition that disrupts nerve function and leads to chronic pain are substantial. Fibromyalgia is associated with widespread fluctuating symptoms including muscle pain, fatigue, insomnia, and joint stiffness that can be treated by medications, lifestyle changes and stress management. In their paper, the ICES researchers observe that past research has shown that fibromyalgia is sometimes a consequence of a past motor vehicle crash; however, this is the first study to investigate whether fibromyalgia could also lead to a future motor vehicle crash. "We found the absolute risk of a serious
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