Low Frequency Sound Simulation Reduces Fibromyalgia Symptoms, Study Shows

Low Frequency Sound Simulation Reduces Fibromyalgia Symptoms, Study Shows
A study published by a team of investigators at the University of Toronto’s Music and Health Research Collaboratory and the Wilfred Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario presented evidence that the use of low-frequency sound stimulation (LFSS) in clinical management of fibromyalgia (FM) leads to symptom improvement. The study’s findings were published in the journal Pain Research Management, the journal of the Canadian Pain Society. FM is a chronic condition associated with widespread pain in muscles and joints, abnormal pain processing, sleep disturbance, fatigue and even psychological distress. According to the CDC, FM affects approximately 2% to 5% of the US population, predominately women (Female to Male 7:1) and the majority are diagnosed as unknown etiology (cause). Past research has shown that there is a connection with Thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD) and FM. In the human brain, the thalamocortical system consists of neural signals that are continuously firing between the nuclei in the thalamus and neurons in the cortex. These neurons do not idle and are found to always be either at 5 Hz during a resting state or upwards of 500 Hz when activated. In TCD, normal thalamocortical resonance is disrupted by changes in the behavior of neurons in the thalamus that leads to their persistent oscillations at around 5 Hz. The present study uses LFSS to regulate TCD by normalizing the neural oscillatory activity in a sample of FM patients. The investigators studied a cohort of 19 females who were previously diagnosed with FM without a comparison control group. The cohort was administered 10 treatments (twice per week for five weeks) that involved 23 minutes of LFSS at 40 Hz delivered using transducers while the patients were lying face up in a relaxed po
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