Salk and Harvard Scientists Report Breakthrough Finding Spinal Circuitry Dysfunction A Chronic Pain Factor

Salk and Harvard Scientists Report Breakthrough Finding Spinal Circuitry Dysfunction A Chronic Pain Factor
fibromyalgia syndromeFibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is a chronic illness that presents with immense physical pain of indeterminate cause that is sometimes accompanied by debilitating fatigue. Fibromyalgia is a syndrome -- a constellation of signs and symptoms observed in, and characteristic of, a single condition -- and not a specific disease with clearly defined causes and treatment. FMS is typically characterized by musculoskeletal pain that can range through the entire body, frequently accompanied by fatigue, sleep disorders, and sometimes memory and mood issues ("brain fade"). The currently prevailing theory of causation is that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting how their brain processes pain signals. When a person touches a hot object or steps on something sharp, a sensation of pain is the normal response. However for sufferers from chronic pain disorders such as fibromyalgia and phantom limb pain, and even gentle skin contact can result in agonizing pain response. A research team led by scientists at the Salk Institute in La Jolla, California, and Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, Massachusetts reports what they categorize as major breakthrough, having identified a neural mechanism in the spinal cord that apparently has the capacity to send the brain erroneous pain signals -- a finding based on charting pain signaling spinal circuits in mice. The results are report
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