Fibromyalgia Pain Related To Diminished Connectivity Between Brain Areas – Study

Fibromyalgia Pain Related To Diminished Connectivity Between Brain Areas – Study
Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is a chronic illness of indeterminate cause, a syndrome -- that is a constellation of signs and symptoms observed in, and characteristic of, a single condition -- and not a specific disease with clearly defined causes and treatment. FMS is typically characterized by moderate to severe musculoskeletal pain that can range through the entire body, frequently accompanied by fatigue, sleep disorders, restless legs syndrome, tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression, morning stiffness, and sometimes memory issues. The currently prevailing theory of causation is that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting how their brain processes pain signals. brainconnectivityHowever, a new study observing and comparing brain activity in persons with fibromyalgia with that of healthy controls has found evidence that diminished connectivity between pain signal processing and sensorimotor areas of the brain could be contributory to pain regulation deficiency in persons afflicted with fibromyalgia. The study findings were recently published in the peer-reviewed Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. journal Brain Connectivity. Conducted by PhD student in cognitive neuroscience Pär Flodin at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and research associates, the current study builds on previous fibromyalgia research showing inadequate pain inhibition in the brain's association with abnormal neuronal activity. In the Brain Con
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