Fibromyalgia Diagnosis May Be Improved by Including 4 Painful Regions, According to German Study

Fibromyalgia Diagnosis May Be Improved by Including 4 Painful Regions, According to German Study
Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disease that is difficult to diagnose, and over the years clinicians have tried to improve the dignostic criteria to exclude other diseases. Fibromyalgia was initially diagnosed using the Widespread Pain Index (WPI) according to criteria established in 1990 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The patient had to experience pain distributed in four quadrants plus axial pain (pain that you can identify in one spot, such as a muscle sprain) over one week. In 2011 the ACR introduced another scale known as the Symptom Severity Scale (SSS) to evaluate patients' health status, including depression, anxiety, sleep, fatigue, and cognition. Now, a diagnosis of fibromyalgia is based on the number of painful areas, number of symptoms, and their severity. A person is diagnosed with FM if he or she has a WPI of seven or more and SSS of five or more; or a WPI of three to six, and SSS of nine or more. In a recent study, German researchers compared the two different criteria and raised some concerns about the current FM diagnostic scales. They analyzed 5,011 patients who satisfied the 2011 criteria and compared them with the WPI according to the 1990 ACR fibromyalgia criteria. The study, “Widespread Pain and Low Widespread Pain Index Scores among Fibromyalgia-positive Cases Assessed with the 2010/2011 Fibromyalgia Criteria,” was published in The Journal of Rheumatology. Of the 5,011 patients, 4,700 of them (93.8 patient) satisfied the ACR 1990 widespread pain criterion. But when researchers used a new more stringent definition requiri
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