Pain Perception in Fibromyalgia Linked to Reduced Brain Activity in Primary Motor Cortex, Study Finds

Pain Perception in Fibromyalgia Linked to Reduced Brain Activity in Primary Motor Cortex, Study Finds
People with fibromyalgia show reduced metabolic activity and altered electrical activity in the primary motor cortex — the areas of the brain that control voluntary body movements, a study has found. These results point to a connection between an altered primary motor cortex and pain perception in fibromyalgia (FM) patients.  The study, titled “Mutual interaction between motor cortex activation and pain in fibromyalgia: EEG-fNIRS study,” was published in the journal PLOS ONE. Activation of the primary motor cortex interacts with parts of the brain that process pain. People who experience chronic pain, such as those with FM, appear to have an altered primary motor cortex. Research has shown that increased physical activity can lead to an improved quality of life for people with FM. However, the complex processes that govern the interaction between movement and pain are not well-understood.   To explore this connection more deeply, researchers based at the
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