Muscle Measurements, Quality of Life Decreased in New and Established Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Suggests

Muscle Measurements, Quality of Life Decreased in New and Established Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Suggests
People with fibromyalgia, including newly diagnosed patients, have small upper and lower extremity muscles — those in the arms and legs — compared with healthy people, a recent study suggests. The decrease in muscle size was associated with an increase in fatigue severity and energy levels, and a reduction in quality of life, the study found. Titled “What happens to muscles in fibromyalgia syndrome,” the study was published in the Irish Journal of Medical Science. Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders, with prevalence rates ranging from 3-6% across different countries of the world. The main symptoms of FMS are chronic musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, and fatigue, all of which are related to the muscle system and how it functions. However, there are still many unknowns about how FMS affects the muscles, and whether there are differences among people with long-term (established) FMS and those newly diagnosed. To learn more, researchers at the Graduate School of Health Sciences at Ankara University in Turkey set out investigate whether upper and lower extremity muscles are different between those newly diagnosed with fibromylagia, etablished patients, and healthy people (controls). Upper extremity muscles include those located in the arm or forearm, wrist, an
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