Fibromyalgia in Younger People More Likely Driven by Genetics, Large Study Suggests

Fibromyalgia in Younger People More Likely Driven by Genetics, Large Study Suggests
Genetics seem to be playing a larger role in driving the development of fibromyalgia in patients, 50 or younger, than in those who are older and more likely to have the condition with an accompanying disorder, or secondary fibromyalgia, a study suggests. These results highlight the importance of taking age into account when studying the genetics of fibromyalgia, the researchers stated. Their study, "Heritability of the fibromyalgia phenotype varies by age," was published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology. Although fibromyalgia (FM) is not passed directly from parents to children, many studies suggest a strong familial component. In fact, DNA studies comparing the genetic background of people with FM with healthy controls have found some genes that may increase susceptibility to fibromyalgia, but such results have been inconsistent. Moreover, the studies performed to date have been small in size and have also been limited to individuals with primary FM, meaning fibromyalgia without any other accompanying conditions. Primary FM typically begins early in life, causing the first symptoms of pain during childhood or adolescence. It occurs more often in females and is associated with other regional pain conditions in individuals and families. Recognizing that, a team of researchers from Johns Hopkins and the University of Michigan, set out to estimate the he
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