Women with Fibromyalgia are More Likely to Adhere to Walking Program if They Feel More in Control, Study Says

Women with Fibromyalgia are More Likely to Adhere to Walking Program if They Feel More in Control, Study Says
Women with fibromyalgia are more likely to adhere to their intentions to participate in walking programs if they perceive they have control, a study has found. Therefore, to promote walking as an effective rehabilitation exercise, health providers should consider strategies to increase their patients' perceived control in order to help them comply with their intentions, the researchers said. The results of their study, "Predicting walking as exercise in women with fibromyalgia from the perspective of the theory of planned behavior," were published in the journal Women & Health. Fibromyalgia is a complex condition characterized by widespread chronic pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances, sexual dysfunction, and memory and mood issues. Treatment for fibromyalgia is challenging, and normally consists of a combination of pharmacological therapies — antidepressants and anticonvulsants — and non-pharmacological approaches, such as physical exercise, cognitive‐behavioral therapy, and rehabilitation programs. "In particular, exercise of low to moderate intensity has shown benefits in FM [fibromyalgia] health outcomes, and walking has been shown to decrease pain and improve mobility and function," the investigators wrote. "However, adherence to walking programs
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