Kinin Receptors Help Drive Fibromyalgia Pain, Mouse Study Suggests

Kinin Receptors Help Drive Fibromyalgia Pain, Mouse Study Suggests
Kinin receptors are important regulators of — and potential therapeutic targets for — pain in fibromyalgia, a study in mice suggests. The study with that finding, "Kinins and their B1 and B2 receptors are involved in fibromyalgia-like pain symptoms in mice," was published in the journal Biochemical Pharmacology. Kinins are peptides (small proteins) that typically are made by the body in response to injury. Moreover, these molecules can activate pain and inflammation by binding to receptors called B1 and B2. In the study, researchers hypothesized that kinins and their receptors might play a role in fibromyalgia pain. They used a mouse model of fibromyalgia, induced by treatment with the drug reserpine. In mice, treatment with reserpine causes symptoms similar to those of fibromyalgia, such as exacerbated pain responses to stimuli that shouldn't be painful, such as light touching and cold. Moreover, the animals also stop burrowing behavior, which is sort of analogous to how fibromyalgia pain might interfere with normal daily activities. Researchers first confirmed that their model worked; the mice given reserpine exhibited the expected behavioral responses, and they didn't have other adverse side effects (e.g., weight loss, skin irritability, etc.) that might have affected the experiments. The
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