Childhood Bullying May Increase Fibromyalgia Risk in Adulthood, Study Suggests

Childhood Bullying May Increase Fibromyalgia Risk in Adulthood, Study Suggests
Children who are bullied may be at a greater risk of developing fibromyalgia as adults, according to a cross-sectional study. The study, "The association between bullying victimization in childhood and fibromyalgia. Data from the nationwide Finnish health and social support (HeSSup) study based on a sample of 64,797 individuals," was published in the Journal of Psychosomatic Research. Fibromyalgia is a complex condition characterized by physical symptoms such as chronic pain and fatigue, and psychological symptoms such as memory problems, depression, and mood changes. The condition is believed to be caused by a combination of factors such as infectious diseases, physical or emotional trauma, and hormonal changes. Adverse events during childhood are risk factors for developing chronic pain and fibromyalgia in adulthood, and individuals with a genetic predisposition to these conditions are more sensitive to these triggers. Bullying is a common childhood issue that can have a negative long-term impact on mental and physical health, but its association with fibromyalgia had not been studied before now. In this cross-sectional study, researchers explored whether children who were bullied were at a higher risk of developing fibromyalgia as adults. The study included 11,924 Finni
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