Self-assessment of Insomnia in Fibromyalgia Patients Influenced by Opioid Use, Age, Study Reports

Self-assessment of Insomnia in Fibromyalgia Patients Influenced by Opioid Use, Age, Study Reports
High-dose opioid use in older patients who have fibromyalgia with insomnia is associated with perceptions of worse sleep compared to younger patients, according to researchers. The study, “Discrepancies in sleep diary and actigraphy assessments in adults with fibromyalgia: Associations with opioid dose and age,” was published in the Journal of Sleep Research. Patients with fibromyalgia experience chronic widespread pain, and up to 80% of patients experience insomnia, a sleep disorder that's characterized by difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. Symptoms of insomnia can be assessed through a number of methods. One subjective method is the use of a sleep diary. An objective method is called actigraphy. Actigraphy is a noninvasive method of monitoring sleep patterns. A small portable device — called an actimetry sensor — is worn for a week or more to measure movement. Older patients with insomnia generally report shorter estimates of insomnia in their diary compared to what is determined using actigraphy, suggesting that they underestimate their degree of insomnia. But fibromyalgia patients with poor sleep quality typically report longer insomnia estimates in their diary compared to objective estimates, suggesting that they overestimate their level of insomnia. Therefore, diary and actigraphic methods often produce different results. While the diary measures a patient's perception regarding insomnia, actigraphy provides the actual physiological measure of insomni
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *