Caffeine Use Improves Pain Management for Opioid Users, Study Finds

Caffeine Use Improves Pain Management for Opioid Users, Study Finds
A recent study suggests that low amounts of caffeine consumption — measured by the number of cups of coffee consumed — reduces pain symptoms associated with fibromyalgia in patients who also take opioids. Coffee consumption is associated with several health benefits, including increased vigilance, improved mood status, and positive cardiovascular effects. Several studies have shown that caffeine, when administered in conjunction with analgesics such as aspirin or acetaminophen, can enhance the effects of these analgesics. However, the relationship between caffeine and chronic pain is still uncertain. Furthermore, caffeine's role as an adjuvant for opioid use has not been studied. Now, in the study "Caffeine as an opioid analgesic adjuvant in fibromyalgia," researchers looked at how caffeine consumption affects pain symptoms in opioid-using and non-using fibromyalgia patients. The results were published in the Journal of Pain Research. Patients with fibromyalgia were treated between 2010-2014 at the Back and Pain Center, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan Health System. Each was asked to complete a survey. Patients self-reported their symptoms, coffee consumption (low, moderate, high), and opioid use. Participants were divided according to their caffeine consumption into three groups: Low was less than one cup a day, moderate use was 1.5–2.5 cups a day), and high consumption was classified as 3-12 cups a day. Of the 962 fibromyalgia patients included in the study, 59 percent were on opioid therap
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