Hypovitaminosis D May Be A Factor In Fibromyalgia And Other Chronic Pain Disorders

Hypovitaminosis D May Be A Factor In Fibromyalgia And Other Chronic Pain Disorders
Hypovitaminosis D is a deficiency of vitamin D that may result from inadequate nutritional intake of the nutrient from food and/or inadequate exposure to sunlight, or more rarely disorders that limit vitamin D absorption or impair vitamin D conversion into active metabolites. Currently the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for vitamin D established by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is 600 international units per day for persons under 70 years of age, and 800 IU per day thereafter. Vitamin D deficiency is recognized as a worldwide health problem associated with an array of maladies such as rickets in children, increased risk of common cancers, autoimmune diseases, hypertension, infectious diseases and depression. Some researchers believe Hypovitaminosis D may also precipitate or exacerbate musculoskeletal pain, fibromyalgia, osteopenia, osteoporosis and fractures in adults. Causes of Vitamin D deficiency have been attributed to wearing of sunscreen to reduce the risk of skin cancers from sun exposure, which significantly reduces vitamin D synthesis in the skin. Compounding the problem is the fact that few foods naturally contain vitamin D and even intake of vitamin D-rich foods is often inadequate to satisfy vitamin D requirements, and that improving vitamin D status could result in positive effects on public health and potentially reduce health care costs for many chronic diseases. However, the optimum level of Vitamin D intake from food and supplementation is an issue of controversy, with some advocates, including some clinicians specializing in treatment of chronic widespread pain (CWP) disorders like fibromyalgia and myofacial pain syndrome, believe that Vitamin D supplementation far higher than the IOM/NAS 600-8
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