Study Finds Medical Marijuana Safe And Effective For Chronic Pain Relief

Study Finds Medical Marijuana Safe And Effective For Chronic Pain Relief
In a national multicenter study investigating the safety of medical cannabis use by patients suffering from chronic pain, a research team led by Dr. Mark Ware from the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal, Canada has found that chronic pain patients who used cannabis daily for one year, when carefully monitored, had no increase in serious adverse events compared to pain patients who did not use cannabis. The study results, which have been published online in The Journal of Pain, will serve as a benchmark study on cannabis side effects of when used for pain management. The Journal of Pain Open Access paper, entitled "Cannabis for the Management of Pain: Assessment of Safety Study (COMPASS)" (The Journal of Pain, 2015; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpain.2015.07.014), is coauthored by Mark A. Ware, MBBS MRCP MS, Tongtong Wang, BMed PhD, Stan Shapiro, PhD, Jean-Paul Collet, MD PhD, Aline Boulanger, MD, John M. Esdaile, MD, Allan Gordon, MD, Mary Lynch, MD, Dwight E. Moulin, MD, and Colleen OConnell, MD. The coauthors note that Cannabis is widely used as a self-management strategy by patients with a wide range of symptoms and diseases including chronic noncancer pain, but the safety of cannabis use for medical purposes has not been systematically evaluated. They conducted a prospective cohort study to describe safety issues among subjects with chronic noncancer pain, with a standardized herbal cannabis product containing a consistent 12.5% Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) was dispensed to eligible subjects for a one-year period. Controls were subjects with chronic pain from the same clinics who were not cannabis users. The study's pr
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