Fibromyalgia Pain Has Central Nervous System Origins

Fibromyalgia Pain Has Central Nervous System Origins
Although it continues to be widely misunderstood, Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FM) is nonetheless now the second most common rheumatic disorder, behind only osteoarthritis. FM is considered to be a lifelong central nervous system disorder -- responsible for amplified pain that shoots through the body in persons who suffer from it. In addition to pain, individuals suffering with fibromyalgia often experience fatigue, poor quality of sleep, and difficulties with memory and concentration, among other symptoms. ClauwDDaniel Clauw, M.D. , a professor of anesthesiology at the University of Michigan, analyzed the neurological basis for fibromyalgia in a plenary session address delivered last week at the American Pain Society's 34th Annual Scientific Meeting, which was held May 13–16, 2015 at the Palm Springs Convention Center in Palm Springs, California. The American Pain Society is a multidisciplinary community that brings together a diverse group of scientists, clinicians, and other professionals to increase the knowledge of pain and transform public policy and clinical practice to reduce pain-related suffering. The APS’s Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) offers innovative, collaborative, and interdisciplinary pain science educational sessions focused on diagnosis, treatment, management, and research of acute pain, chronic cancer and non cancer pain, and recurrent pain. "Fibro
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