Emotion Processing in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome May Hold Clues to Brain Responses in Fibromyalgia

Emotion Processing in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome May Hold Clues to Brain Responses in Fibromyalgia
shutterstock_177029225 In a recent study published in the journal European Psychiatry, a team of researchers from Barcelona aimed to understand the association between emotion processing and brain responses in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome. Joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) is an inherited connective tissue disorder that represents a qualitative variation in the structural protein collagen. JHS has an estimated prevalence in the general population ranging between 10–15% and it is more frequent in women (3:1). Although JHS is a common condition, it remains poorly documented. The condition has been related to anxiety disorders, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and temporomandibular joint disorder. Nonetheless, the neural foundations of these associations are poorly understood, and many physicians still find it challenging to distinguish JHS from fibromyalgia.

In the

Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *