Behavioral Therapy Helps Promote Healthier Sleeping, But Only in Short Term

Behavioral Therapy Helps Promote Healthier Sleeping, But Only in Short Term
Cognitive behavioral therapy for pain can lead to an immediate decrease in the use of sleep medications among people with insomnia due to fibromyalgia, a study found. However, such behavioral therapy is not effective in the long-term or as a stand-alone treatment, with medication use returning to pre-treatment levels after about six months, its researchers said. The study, “Effect of cognitive behavioural therapy on sleep and opioid medication use in adults with fibromyalgia and insomnia,” was published in the Journal of Sleep Research. Insomnia is thought to affect up to 80% of adults with chronic pain, supporting the idea that the two are bidirectional, meaning one contributes to the other. Common treatments for chronic pain  and insomnia are sedatives (hypnotics) and opioids. However, these medications do not consistently provide long-term relief, and are known to have adverse effects that can include dependence, a risk of an overdose, and heart problems. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT‐I) and pain (CBT‐P) are potential non-pharmacological treatments. CBT‐I consists of session that include sleep education, relaxation and cognitive restructuring; CBT-P includes session on pain education, progressive muscle relaxation, activity-rest cycles, and cognitive restructuring. A
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