Addiction Medicine Naltrexone May Relieve Tenderness, Fatigue in Fibromyalgia, Pilot Study Shows

Addiction Medicine Naltrexone May Relieve Tenderness, Fatigue in Fibromyalgia, Pilot Study Shows
Daily low oral doses of naltrexone —  a medicine normally used to treat opioid or alcohol addiction —  may relieve tenderness, fatigue, and pain in people with fibromyalgia, a pilot dose-response study has found. A daily dose of 4.5 mg seems to be a good choice for lessening such fibromyalgia symptoms, although researchers state that more robust studies — larger, randomized, placebo-controlled trials — are needed to define the optimal treatment regimen and benefits of naltrexone. These findings were reported in the study, “Low-Dose Naltrexone for the Treatment of Fibromyalgia: Investigation of Dose–Response Relationships,” published in the journal Pain Medicine. There is no cure for fibromyalgia, a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain, and fatigue, sleep, memory, and mood issues. Medications commonly used to treat the disorder usually focus either on blocking the activity of certain messenger molecules — called neurotransmitters — involved in the excessive transmission of nerve signals in the brain, or prolonging the effects of messengers that offset those signals. Oral naltrexone, marketed as Revia and Vivitrol, and also available as generics, is an add-on treatment for opioid or alcohol dependence. It also has
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