Reduced Dermal Nerve Fibers May Be Source of Fibromyalgia Heat Sensitivity, Study Suggests

Reduced Dermal Nerve Fibers May Be Source of Fibromyalgia Heat Sensitivity, Study Suggests
The heat sensitivity common in people with fibromyalgia may be due to the reduced length of nerve fibers that contact blood vessels in the inner dermal layers of skin, a recent study suggests. The study, “Characterization of dermal skin innervation in fibromyalgia syndrome,” was published in the journal PLOS ONE. Fibromyalgia (FMS) is characterized by widespread chronic pain, as well as other varied symptoms such as fatigue, cognitive difficulties, sleep problems, and heat sensitivity. There is increasing evidence that the peripheral nervous system — encompassing nerves outside the brain and spinal cord — is involved due to the high prevalence of patients with small fiber pathology.  Small fiber disease, which is defined by severe whole-body pain, occurs from dysfunction and damage to small nerve fibers present in the skin, organs, and other peripheral nerves.  Studies have shown that people with fibromyalgia have a
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