History of Domestic Violence May Put Women at Risk for Developing Fibromyalgia, Study Says

History of Domestic Violence May Put Women at Risk for Developing Fibromyalgia, Study Says
Women with a history of intimate partner violence are more likely to develop fibromyalgia, as well as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), according to a recent study. These findings highlight the need to investigate the biological and psychological pathways that lead to fibromyalgia, and also help to inform healthcare professionals on the risk factors and best management for this patient population, researchers say. Their study, titled "Intimate Partner Violence and the Risk of Developing Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome," was published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Experiencing abuse can have long-lasting impacts on both mental and physical health. For example, childhood abuse and sexual trauma have been linked to an increased risk of both fibromyalgia and CFS. An estimated one in three women experience intimate partner violence (IPV). However, whether experiencing this kind of abuse during adulthood is associated with an increased risk of fibromyalgia and/or CFS hasn't been thoroughly investigated. Of note, fibromyalgia is associated with pain without a clear source, and CF
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