Crying Helps My Fibromyalgia Pain

Crying Helps My Fibromyalgia Pain
Quite by accident this week, I learned something important about myself. It was the eighth day of a very painful recurrence of occipital neuralgia. At the emergency room, I was told that the estimated wait time was at least four hours. In addition to a pain level of nine out of 10, my emotions were at an all-time high. Self-pity was high on my list, followed closely by frustration, fear, and disappointment at missing the memorial service for a friend's husband. I had spent the better part of the day around truly sick patients. And there was the niggling thought that by the time a doctor saw me, I’d be feeling fine. That did not happen. What did happen was an onslaught of tears. It was the first time I remember actually sobbing in public. By then, I was beyond caring. Once they began, my tears flowed like Niagara Falls. After many minutes and many tissues, they finally stopped. That’s when I made my discovery. My pain wasn't quite so bad! Did crying reduce my pain? I was excited to return home and research this theory. What I found were mixed results. One often-quoted study indicated that emotional tears (meaning those from pain rather than from peeling onions) contained more protein than other tears, indicating that healing had taken place. However, subsequent studies failed to produce the same results. One study showed that a third of the participants showed no improvement. Results of studies done on the
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