Pain Levels, Disability Greater in Children with Fibromyalgia Than with Other Rheumatic Diseases, Study Finds

Pain Levels, Disability Greater in Children with Fibromyalgia Than with Other Rheumatic Diseases, Study Finds
Young people with juvenile fibromyalgia report higher pain levels and show greater "functional disability" affecting daily life than do children with other rheumatic diseases, a recent study reports. However, these findings also suggest that pain scores are less associated with functional disability among children with juvenile fibromyalgia than among children with these other diseases. The study, "Pain, functional disability, and their Association in Juvenile Fibromyalgia Compared to other pediatric rheumatic diseases," was published in Pediatric Rheumatology. Pain is the defining characteristic of juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS). And in "a subset of youth with JPFS, pain is associated with significant and enduring impairment in the ability to participate in usual activities and maintain positive well-being," the researchers wrote. It also significantly impairs the quality of life of young patients with other rheumatic childhood diseases. Researchers assessed how pain scores tended to compare between diseases, and whether those scores were associated with changes in children's ability to function. They analyzed data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Legacy Registry, which included data from 56 pediatric rheumatology centers in North America. The analyzed sample included 201 children with JPFS and 7,552 with other childhood rheumatic diseases, namely 
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