Nerve Cell Growth Factors Not Elevated in Blood of FM Patients, Study Finds, Contrary to Prior Research

Nerve Cell Growth Factors Not Elevated in Blood of FM Patients, Study Finds, Contrary to Prior Research
Plasma levels of BDNF and NGF — two nerve cell growth factors proposed to underlie fibromyalgia (FM) — were not found to be elevated in patients compared with healthy individuals, a study shows. These findings contradict prior research and raise questions about the theory that BDNF and NGF are involved in increased sensitivity to pain felt by FM patients, and that they cause alterations in sensory nerve cells outside the brain and spinal cord. The study, "No evidence for altered plasma NGF and BDNF levels in fibromyalgia patients," was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Chronic pain disorders such as fibromyalgia are thought to arise from alterations in central sensitization — an overactivation of nerve cells involved in pain perception in the brain and/or spinal cord — and peripheral sensitization, which is a hypersensitivity to stimuli originating at nerve cells in sensory organs. In the quest to find biomarkers for these changes in sensitization, scientists have focused on factors that support the growth and survival of nerve cells (neurotrophic factors), including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). BDNF is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS, involving the brain and spinal cord), gut, and other tissues,
Subscribe or to access all post and page content.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *