Study Finds Fibromyalgia Symptoms Differ Across European Regions

Study Finds Fibromyalgia Symptoms Differ Across European Regions
Women with fibromyalgia living in different regions of Europe report significantly different scores when assessing their symptoms, a recent study shows. The study, "Fibromyalgia Impact Score in Women with Fibromyalgia Across Southern, Central, and Northern Areas of Europe," was published in the journal Pain Physician. The Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), developed in the early 1990s, is a questionnaire commonly used to assess the severity of fibromyalgia symptoms and how much they affect an individual's day-to-day life. Although the questionnaire is used worldwide — it is available in more than a dozen languages — there isn't much information on how scores tend to differ in different parts of the world, in distinct geographic and societal/cultural contexts. In this study, researchers administered the FIQ to female participants affected by fibromyalgia in Spain, Belgium, the Netherlands, and Sweden. All participants were grouped into one of three broader geographical groups: Northern, Central, and Southern Europe. The study included 1,478 women: 531 from Southern Europe (Spain), 629 from Central Europe (Belgium and Netherlands), and 318 from Northern Europe (Sweden). The average age of all three groups was about 50 years. However, there were small — but statistically sign
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