Although Pain Lessens over Time, Young FM Patients Show Persistent Symptoms

Although Pain Lessens over Time, Young FM Patients Show Persistent Symptoms
Children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with juvenile fibromyalgia show persistent symptoms, with lower prevalence of musculoskeletal pain over time yet worsened well-being, according to a large study. The findings also revealed moderate to severe pain, which was worsened by stress, physical activity, and weather changes. The research, “Demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics of the juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome cohort enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance Legacy Registry,” appeared in the journal Pediatric Rheumatology. Studies of juvenile fibromyalgia have been conducted in small samples, almost exclusively with female patients. Also, criteria for its diagnosis are not uniform, and knowledge of outcomes and effective treatments remains scarce, which leads to significant variability in clinical practice. The scientists addressed these gaps, as well as whether symptoms and functioning change over time, by using data from the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Legacy Registry, which includes more than 9,000 youth with rheumatic diseases across 50 clinical sites in North America. Besides information such as date of symptom onset and of the first visit to a pediatric rheumatologist, the scientists also assessed common symptoms present before study start, including musculoskeletal pain, headaches, numbness and tingling of the extremities, sleep disturbances, and pain with physical activity, weather changes, anxiety, or
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