Gabapentin May Reduce Women’s Pain During Sex, Research Suggests

Gabapentin May Reduce Women’s Pain During Sex, Research Suggests
An anti-seizure and nerve pain drug called gabapentin improved sexual function in women with chronic pain in the vulva (the external part of the female genitalia). While the medication is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of fibromyalgia, some doctors prescribe it off-label. The study, “Effect of gabapentin on sexual function in vulvodynia: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial,” was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. This is the first time scientists have evaluated gabapentin’s effects in women with vulva pain. "Previous studies have suggested gabapentin reduces the pain of fibromyalgia, a chronic condition that includes widespread pain in various parts of the body,” Gloria Bachmann, MD, MMS, director of the Women's Health Institute at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and the study’s first author, said in a press release. During intercourse or insertion of a tampon, some women experience stinging, burning, irritation, or itching of the entry of the vagina, a condition known as provoked vulvodynia. This chronic pain syndrome affects all domains of sexual function, including arousal, orgasm, satisfaction and pain. Researchers previously reported that women with both vulvodynia and fibromyalgia have increased pelvic muscle pain as measured by a vaginal a
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