Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Improves Sleep in Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Shows

Cognitive Behavioral Treatment Improves Sleep in Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Shows
Cognitive behavioral treatment for pain and insomnia improves sleep, but not pain and general mood, in patients with fibromyalgia, a study suggests. The study, "Cognitive behavioral treatments for insomnia (CBT-I) and pain (CBT-P) in adults with comorbid chronic insomnia and fibromyalgia: Clinical outcomes from the SPIN randomized controlled trial," was published in the journal SLEEP. Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread muscle pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, and memory and mood issues. Recent studies have shown that insomnia, considered one of the hallmark symptoms of the condition, not only contributes to worse chronic pain, but also seems to promote the development of other painful medical conditions. Further studies confirmed that cognitive behavioral treatment for insomnia was effective at improving sleep and reducing pain symptoms in patients with fibromyalgia. These findings raised the question of whether cognitive behavioral treatment for pain might also reduce pain in these patients. One study assessed the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral treatment for pain in patients with fibromyalgia. However, the clinical outcomes were not compared with the treatment for insomnia. The Sleep and Pain Interventions trial (NCT02001077) was designed to test and compare the efficacy of insomnia and pain cognitive behavioral treatments on
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