Two Proteins Identified as Potential Markers for Fibromyalgia in Large-Scale Analysis, Study Reports

Two Proteins Identified as Potential Markers for Fibromyalgia in Large-Scale Analysis, Study Reports
Two proteins linked to inflammation and oxidative stress are deregulated in blood samples of fibromyalgia (FM) patients compared with healthy controls, according to findings from a large-scale protein analysis. Specifically, the levels of these two proteins, called haptoglobin and fibrinogen, which respond to inflammation, were found to be increased in fibromyalgia patients and may work as biomarkers for a faster and more timely diagnosis, the researchers suggest. The study, “Insight into the biological pathways underlying fibromyalgia by a proteomic approach,” was published in the Journal of Proteomics. The underlying cause of fibromyalgia, a disease characterized by widespread muscle pain and fatigue, remains unknown; however, several factors are known to contribute to the condition. Among these factors, inflammation and oxidative stress are the most frequently reported. Oxidative stress is caused by an imbalance between the body’s production of potentially harmful reactive oxygen species and its ability to contain them. The complexity of factors contributing to fibromyalgia represent an added difficulty to treatment and even diagnosis of the disease — it can take up to five years for patients to be diagnosed. This highlights the need to find good markers that may assist in identifying fibromyalgia in a more timely manner so that appropriate treatments are administered promptly. In this study, researchers used a technique called proteomics to identify and measure potential changes in proteins in the blood of fibromyalgia pa
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