Immune System May Play Role in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests

Immune System May Play Role in Fibromyalgia, Study Suggests
Through a new genetic analysis, researchers have found evidence suggesting the involvement of the immune system in fibromyalgia (FM), a study reports. Inherited mutations in genes that provide instructions for the production of three immune molecules — called CCL11, CCL4 and MEFV — impact the immune system and may be associated with the risk of fibromyalgia, according to the researchers. The study, “SNPs in inflammatory genes CCL11CCL4 and MEFV in a fibromyalgia family study,” waa published in the journal Plos One. Previous family studies have suggested a genetic component linked to fibromyalgia, with several pieces of evidence pointing to a role for genes involved in inflammatory pathways. In another study, researchers found that the levels of several inflammatory chemokines — proteins secreted by cells — were elevated in fibromyalgia. Among these were the chemokines CCL11 and CCL4, located in a chemokine gene cluster in chromosome 17, which is associated with immune-related disorders, including atopic dermatitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Researchers in this study performed a sequencing analysis of the chemokine gene cluster identified in chromosome 17 in 100 fibromyalgia patients. Their DNA was extracted from blood immune cells, called lymphocytes, or saliva. The same analysis was performed in the DNA from
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