Music Therapy May Improve Well-being, Reduce Anxiety in Fibromyalgia Patients, Trial Suggests

Music Therapy May Improve Well-being, Reduce Anxiety in Fibromyalgia Patients, Trial Suggests
Music therapy in a group setting may improve the well-being and reduce anxiety in women with fibromyalgia, according to researchers from Spain. Their study, “Randomized Trial of a Group Music and Imagery Method (GrpMI) for Women with Fibromyalgia,” appeared in the Journal of Music Therapy. Current interventions for the treatment of fibromyalgia include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic approaches. But medications have a limited effectiveness, may cause damage to certain organs, and increase the burden on health services. As a result, researchers have increasingly focused on psychological treatments, demonstrating their benefits in easing fibromyalgia symptoms and helping patients learn coping techniques. Earlier research showed that music therapy is effective in reducing pain, emotional distress, and the use of medications. Benefits have also been reported specifically in fibromyalgia, as the combination of music, relaxation and/or guided imagery — a technique which uses mental images to help reach a relaxed state — reduced pain and depression. Guided imagery and music (GIM) aims to improve relaxation, provide cognitive and emotional stimulation, and help develop social relationships. Imagery may evoke physical sensations, emotions, memories, or thoughts. Research has shown that GIM improves the mood and quality of life of patients, and reduces their anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion. But no specific assessments of fibromyalgia have been made using the GIM strategy, or its group adaptation calle
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