Sex Hormone Fluctuations Regulate Pain Severity in Women with Fibromyalgia, Study Finds

Sex Hormone Fluctuations Regulate Pain Severity in Women with Fibromyalgia, Study Finds
The severity of fibromyalgia pain was found to be associated with daily fluctuations of progesterone and testosterone hormones, according to the results of a study published in The Journal of Pain. The study is titled “Daily Fluctuations of Progesterone and Testosterone are Associated with Fibromyalgia Pain Severity.” Fibromyalgia is a disease characterized by diffuse chronic pain that can severely impact a person’s ability to perform daily life activities. The disease is more frequent in women, with a female to male incidence ratio of 7:1. A previous study showed that the incidence of pediatric fibromyalgia is similar in both genders until the onset of puberty, after which the disease starts to be more frequent among girls than boys. This disparity raised suspicions of a link between sex hormones and chronic pain. A research team at the University of Alabama at Birmingham conducted a daily evaluation of sex hormone levels for more than 25 consecutive days in eight women diagnosed with fibromyalgia. All women kept daily reports of pain severity. Analysis of estradiol, progesterone, and testosterone levels revealed that all the women analyzed had hormone levels consistent with normal menstrual cycles. Day-to-day changes in both pain and hormone levels revealed that lower levels of progesterone and testosterone were significantly associated with increased pain. Add
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