Few Fibromyalgia Patients Adhere to Treatment Regimens, Study Reveals

Few Fibromyalgia Patients Adhere to Treatment Regimens, Study Reveals
Adherence to treatment is very poor among fibromyalgia (FM) patients, according to a study conducted in a real-life setting that was published in The Journal of Rheumatology. Only 9.3 percent of patients followed the prescribed treatment regimen for more than a year. The study “Adherence and Persistence with Drug Therapy among Fibromyalgia Patients: Data from a Large Health Maintenance Organization” was conducted by a team of researchers from Tel Aviv University, Israel. The study was supported by Pfizer. About 2 to 5 percent of women worldwide are affected by FM. With no available cure for the condition, treatments are focused on preventing pain sensation, restoring sleep time, and improving overall physical functions. Non-pharmacologic strategies such as exercise and cognitive-based therapies are commonly used, but many patients need pharmacological management of their symptoms. The majority of the medicines prescribed for FM were designed to regulate how the brain and nerve cells interpret signals (neuromodulatory function). The most commonly used classes of drugs are tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) compounds, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) antidepressants, and the anticonvulsant Lyrica (pregabalin). For FM patients, as for many others with chronic illnesses, adhe
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