More Exercise Reduces Anxiety Longer in Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Finds

More Exercise Reduces Anxiety Longer in Fibromyalgia Patients, Study Finds
An analysis of 10 studies on the effects of exercise on anxiety in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) found that exercise training can cause anxiety to drop. Training programs that lasted longer reduced anxiety more in these patients than shorter ones. The results of the analysis were reported in the article, “The Effects of Exercise Training on Anxiety in Fibromyalgia Patients: A Meta-analysis,” published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. The 10 studies involved 595 patients with fibromyalgia with an average age of 47.6 years. Women accounted for 97.5% of patients. All of the studies randomized the patients between groups who followed exercise programs (297) and patients who did not (298). Anxiety outcomes were measured before and during or after exercise training. Most of the studies used the anxiety subscale of the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (commonly used to evaluate fibromyalgia patients) and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, a questionnaire to assess anxiety. Exercise training consisted of an average of three sessions per week at 46 minutes per session for up to 30 weeks. The mean exercise training attendance rate was 72%. While patients who had exercise training saw a slight drop in their anxiety symptoms, larger drops were seen patients who followed longer training programs. The drops in anxiety were not associated with the degree of pain experienced by the patients. Other studies have shown that exercise has beneficial effects on pain, fatigue, and physical function in patients with fibromyalgia. Effects of exercise compare favorably
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