Swedish Study Looks at Inflammatory Factors Related to Fibromyalgia Pain

Swedish Study Looks at Inflammatory Factors Related to Fibromyalgia Pain
In patients with fibromyalgia, the central nervous system is inflamed, as is the rest of the body, according to a study that found a large range of increased inflammatory factors in the blood and spinal fluid of fibromyalgia patients. But the study could not demonstrate if the increased inflammation causes, or is a risk factor for, pain in fibromyalgia — or if it's a consequence thereof. In addition, other disease-related factors such as inactivity, depression, poor sleep or pain-related stress have all been linked to increased low-grade inflammation. The study, "Evidence of both systemic inflammation and neuroinflammation in fibromyalgia patients, as assessed by a multiplex protein panel applied to the cerebrospinal fluid and to plasma," appeared in the Journal of Pain Research. Plenty of research has shown that fibromyalgia patients seem to have what researchers call central sensitization — a condition in which nerve connections in the spinal cord and brain get overly sensitive to stimuli, also reacting with pain when there is no real pain-causing event. But studies of chronic pain also show that inflammation often accompanies other molecular changes. Earlier attempts to analyze inflammatory factors in fibromyalgia exist, but most studies have looked at a few factors at a time, which only gives researchers a limited view of what is going on. To overcome this, Swedish researchers at Linköping University and
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