Learning to Accept Fibromyalgia, Part Two: Delving Into Your Emotions

Learning to Accept Fibromyalgia, Part Two: Delving Into Your Emotions
FMS and the person within Editor's note: This column is in continuation of "Learning to Accept Fibromyalgia, Part One: Coping and Careers."

 Most people think that suppressing their feelings is the best way to deal with hardship; that somehow crying and expressing intense emotions will make you "weaker" or that you "will cry and never be able to stop." In actuality, the opposite can occur. Not addressing your feelings only worsens physical symptoms, and also may produce depression. Many may not realize that depression is actually sadness internalized, so not acknowledging profound sadness over time can put you at risk for developing depression (aside from genetic predisposition.)

Naturally, the onset of a confirmed diagnosis of a chronic illness is bound to produce an abundance of different emotions, from relief that all of those strange symptoms actually have a name, to anger that you will have to live with this illness. I had been trying to function as if this illness was a shared part of me, rather than a condition that required my full attention. Plus, I was trying to cope to changes to address stress, flares and triggers. The loss of my beloved dad-in-law, as well as my job, forced me into a position of facing me, myself and fibromyalgia. As I have done a couple of times in my life when profoundly sad, I took to my be
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4 comments

  1. I really enjoyed your article. I liked the part…curse, sing, paint.. I think the more honest and open we are with ourselves and others about this illness the easier it becomes to help. Although I days where all I can do is all of the above and somehow I feel better in that moment.

    • Lori Galpeer says:

      I am glad you enjoyed my article. I smiled as I wrote the “curse, paint, sing. .” for the various outlets came to mind. I agree that the more we are honest with ourselves, it makes it easier to take better care of ourselves (i.e. reduce stress; don’t try to overextend muscles, overdo activity). Those who are willing to listen, it helps to be honest for helps them to learn and thus can provide support when needed. I’m glad that doing the comments helped you feel better for the moment. 🙂

  2. DENISE JACOBSON says:

    , I was first diagnosed at Mayo Clinic in 1990 it didn’t bother me just three little over the years 55 it got worse I’m 63 and it’s horrible I do everything that you say to do I walk I exercise if I’m still in horrible horrible pain I can’t stand living like thisI was first diagnosed at Mayo Clinic in 1990 it didn’t bother me just three little over the years 55 it got worse I’m 63 and it’s horrible I do everything that you say to do I walk I exercise I’m still in horrible horrible pain I can’t stand living like this I was first diagnosed at Mayo Clinic in 1990 it didn’t bother me just three little over the years 55 it got worse I’m 63 and it’s horrible I do everything that you say to do I walk I exercised I’m still in horrible horrible pain I can’t stand living like this I was first diagnosed at the Mayo Clinic in 1990 it didn’t bother me just three little over the years 55 it got worse I’m 63 and it’s horrible I do everything that you say to do I walk I exercise if I’m still in horrible horrible pain I can’t stand living like this I was first diagnosed at Mayo Clinic in 1990 it didn’t bother me just three little over the years 55 it got worse I’m 63 and it’s horrible I do everything that you say did you I walk I exercised I’m still in horrible horrible pain I can’t stand living like this

    • DENISE JACOBSON says:

      , this is Denise Jacobson again for some reason there are call repeated some of the paragraphs 2 or 3 times if you want you could have met a couple of those paragraphs cuz they say the same thing I do not know how that happened thank

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