Trigger Point Injections for Pain Relief Now Offered by Medical Center Offices in NJ, NY

Trigger Point Injections for Pain Relief Now Offered by Medical Center Offices in NJ, NY

The University Pain Medicine Center with offices in New Jersey and New York is now offering trigger point injections to relieve pain, according to a news release.

The minimally invasive procedure benefits those with chronic pain conditions like fibromyalgia, which affects 5 million Americans ages 18 or older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Fibromyalgia causes widespread pain, sleep problems, fatigue, and often, psychological distress. Some people also report restless leg syndrome, bowel or bladder problems, numbness and tingling, and sensitivity to noise, light, or temperature. The condition can lead to disability.

Trigger points are focus areas of spasm and inflammation in skeletal muscle. These points generally feel like a knot or nodule that is tender or painful to the touch. In some cases the pain then radiates out to the surrounding area.

Trigger points commonly accompany chronic musculoskeletal disorders and conditions such as fibromyalgia, headaches, neck pain, lower back pain, frozen shoulder, and myofascial pain syndrome. Acute trauma or repetitive minor injury can also lead to the development of trigger points.

The trigger point injections offered at the University Pain Medicine Center involve the injection of a local anesthetic with or without cortisone (a steroid) into the muscle where patients have tenderness or pain. The injection forces the trigger point to become inactive and the pain is alleviated. A brief course of treatment will result in sustained relief.

The medication will provide long-term pain relief, while the anesthetic will work temporarily. The injections are a quick outpatient procedure in a doctor’s office, usually taking just a few minutes and no recovery time. The injections are generally used to treat muscle groups in the neck, arms, lower back, and legs.

Those experiencing chronic pain often benefit greatly from trigger point injections. They also act as an effective supplement to overall rehabilitation programs, and allow many geriatric patients to persevere through their programs without feeling overwhelmed by pain.

The University Pain Medicine Center is committed to helping patients manage their acute and chronic pain or recover from their injuries. Its board-certified physicians work out of five offices in New Jersey and New York.

10 comments

  1. Denise Bault says:

    I’ve been getting TPI’s for over a year. My pain mgmt. doc injects my neck, cervical area, shoulders, and lumbar region. Helps immensely when you first start. A real welcome relief! Unfortunately, they usually use steroids – although there are some other natural things they can use which didn’t really work for me – and you can only have it done once every 8 weeks. Since I’ve been getting them for so long, I now am on a ten week schedule. The efficacy does diminish, but it really helps at the time! I’m counting down to my next appt. The shots do hurt, especially in the neck, but they took away at least a third + of my pain.

  2. Katherine J. Turcotte says:

    Check Mt Laurel NJ Rheumatologist, Dr. Richa Mishra. She treats my fibromyalgia with trigger point injections.

    • Denise Bault says:

      Cyndie, I get mine done at my pain management doctor’s office. If you are not seeing one, try and find one. The injections really do help the huge muscle spasms I have in my neck, shoulders and lumbar region. The down side is that it is usually some type of steroid and the efficacy will go down as the months go by. They took away at least 30% of my total body pain, which was a huge relief!

  3. Mandy says:

    When I saw this article, I was really interested to hear what other people thought of trigger point injections and what their reactions were to them. When I first started seeing my pain specialist, he recommended them for my neck and lumbar areas but they didn’t work for me. I actually experienced flare-ups after receiving the treatments which was counter-productive! I guess everyone is different and my body doesn’t respond well to invasive-type treatments. Personally, I’ve found going to the chiropractor and walking have helped me more than anything else.

    • Tim Bossie says:

      Hi Mandy! You are absolutely correct about everyone being different in their response to treatments. I had trigger point injections myself and they also did not work for me. A lot of pain for more pain. 🙁 Walking, exercising and staying active are what help me the most.

      • Mandy says:

        Hi Tim! It’s so nice to hear from someone else whose experience is similar to mine. I don’t know many people who have Fibro and I was only diagnosed three years ago, so I’m still learning about my body’s strengths and limitations. Along with the moderate exercise and staying active, I find having a positive attitude has made a world of difference in my life. Instead of focusing on the pain all the time, I make sure that I focus on the positive experiences I want to have 🙂

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