Researchers Map Full-length Protein Involved in Chronic Pain, with Hopes for Future Therapies

Researchers Map Full-length Protein Involved in Chronic Pain, with Hopes for Future Therapies
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers have discovered the full-length structure of a protein named Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid subtype 2 (TRPV2), with implications for the development of new treatments for chronic pain and cancer. The paper, "Structure of the full-length TRPV2 channel by cryo-EM," was published in Nature Communications. Researchers led by Dr. Vera Moiseenkova-Bell had previously established the link between TRPV2’s molecular mechanism in a study published in December 2015 in Molecular and Cellular Biology, titled “Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling to Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.” Moiseenkova-Bell’s team’s lab is the first to accurately and fully model TRPV2’s structure. The group used neuronal cells to reveal the previously unidentified molecular mechanism of the protein's function in the process of neurite growth. “By combining our findings regarding both this protein’s structure and molecular mechanism, we can investigate it with a more holistic understanding,” said Moiseenkova-Bell, Ph.D., principal investigator and assistant professor at Case Western's School of Medicine Pharmacology Department, in a press release.
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