Clinicial Trial of Non-Drug Headband Device for Fibromyalgia Launched by University Researchers

Clinicial Trial of Non-Drug Headband Device for Fibromyalgia Launched by University Researchers
A new clinical trial of a non-drug approach for treating fibromyalgia is being conducted by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC). The study will investigate the use of a proprietary electrode-emitting headband device called Cefaly, currently in use for treating migraine headaches, to assess its potential therapeutic effect on people with the chronic and painful fibromyalgia. In addition to pain, fibromyalgia symptoms typically include fatigue, sleep disturbance, and cognitive thinking. Fibromyalgia afflicts approximately 2 percent of the U.S. population, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and is about seven times more common in women than in men. The Cefaly headband is FDA-approved for treatment of migraine headaches. In its standard use, Cefaly is positioned on the forehead using an adhesive electrode. Precise impulses are produced which act on the trigeminal nerve to prevent migraine attacks. UC is the first research center in America to test the Cefaly device in a trial for patients with fibromyalgia. cefaly

Image courtesy Cefaly

The device delivers electrodes of neuro-stimulation to limit the pain signals from the nerve center in the brain. In migraine sufferers, this may help reduce the frequency and severity of headaches, providing a non-drug alternative treatment for painful and often debilitating migraine attacks.
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