Long-Term Study Shows Chronic Course of Juvenile-Onset Fibromyalgia

Long-Term Study Shows Chronic Course of Juvenile-Onset Fibromyalgia
Results from a recent study published in the journal Pedriatrics analyzed the chronic course of juvenile-onset fibromyalgia for many adolescents who seek medical care for this chronic condition and the functional, emotional, and social effects that can persist into adulthood. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in childhood is common, affecting 6% to 7% of school-aged children, and often encountered in pediatric primary care. For a proportion of patients, typically adolescent females, symptoms that are firstly seen by physicians and parents as temporary “growing pains” may be persistent (beyond 3 months), accompanied by fatigue, headaches, and sleep difficulties, and be medically unexplainable. These teenagers often report high levels of emotional distress, physical impairment and school absences. Juvenile-onset fibromyalgia (JFM) is now increasingly recognized as a pain syndrome. Although there has been some progress in the recognition and clinical management of JFM, very little is known about long-term prognosis. Physicians often reassure their patients that they will likely “outgrow” symptoms. In the study entitled “Long-Term Outcomes of Adolescents With Juvenile-Onset Fibromyalgia in Early Adulthood”, Lesley M. Arnold, MD from the Divisions of a Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology and Rheumatology, Cincinnati Chil
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