The Treatment of Juvenile Fibromyalgia with an Intensive Physical and Psychosocial Program

The Treatment of Juvenile Fibromyalgia with an Intensive Physical and Psychosocial Program
A new Open Source paper published in The Journal of Pediatrics notes that Fibromyalgia is one of the most common amplified pain syndromes in children, occurring in 2%-6% of the pediatric population, and defined as widespread pain lasting at least 3 months and, depending on criteria, associated with between 5 and 11 of 18 trigger points, along with other somatic complaints, such as irritable bowel syndrome, fatigue, unrestorative sleep, and chronic headache. As with adults presenting with fibromyalgia profiles, females predominate at a rate of approximately 4:1, and the disorder also seems to affect Caucasians disproportionately. The etiology of fibromyalgia is unknown, but some of the factors associated with adults with fibromyalgia include depression, and low pain threshold, cortisol dysregulation, and ischemia. Adult fibromyalgia criteria are applied in diagnosing these children, and consequently, the researchers maintain that other potential etiologies need to be ruled out before a diagnosis can be made, noting that no standard criteria have been established for diagnosis of fibromyalgia in children. The paper coauthors observe that treatments for childhood fibromyalgia also remain elusive, with the major focus on cognitive behavioral therapy and aerobic training, and that studies of long-term outcomes have reported persistent pain in more than 90 percent of affected children, with sleep disturbance also found in more than 90 percent of 33 children with fibromyalgia surveyed 2.6 years after diagnosis. Additionally, In a large cohort of children with fibromyalgia, more than 80 percent had symptoms that persisted into adulthood, and, compared with controls, experienced more pain, anxiety, and medical visits, along with decreased physical function at 5.9 years af
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