Gene Expression in Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Depression

Gene Expression in Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Depression
Researchers at the University of Utah revealed new data on the gene expression pattern associated with conditions like fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and depression. The study was published in the journal Arthritis Care and Research and is entitled “Gene expression factor analysis to differentiate pathways linked to fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and depression in a diverse patient sample”. Fibromyalgia is a medical disorder characterized by a set of symptoms that includes widespread chronic musculoskeletal pain, incapacitating fatigue, stiffness and numbness in certain parts of the body, painful response to pressure, headaches, unrefreshing sleep (poor sleep quality), anxiety or depression and mood alterations. Fibromyalgia shares features with another medical condition called CFS, a complex disorder characterized by extreme, remitting/relapsing fatigue that interferes with a person’s well-being and is not relieved by rest or recovery. Other symptoms include post-exertional malaise, muscle and/or joint pain, headaches, loss of memory or concentration, sore throat, enlarged lymph nodes and unrefreshing sleep. Both disorders often co-occur and can affect people’s ability to conduct simple daily tasks, compromising their quality of life. Women are usually more affected than men. There is a close association between fibromyalgia, CFS and depression, with approximately 50% of the patients suffering from depression. Depression has be
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